DUNDALK HERITAGE FAIR IN REVIEW
Tuesday, 02 July 2013 15:12

 

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Record crowd comes to this year’s Heritage Fair

Saturday crowd was the biggest in 38 years

by Ben Boehl

alt    Despite the on-and-off rain showers over the weekend and the increase of ticket prices from $5 to $7, Dundalk Heritage Fair Association president Joe Falbo said this year’s fair had an overall bigger crowd than last year’s.
    He said Friday’s attendance was what he expected and that Sunday’s numbers were a little lower than expected, but said that Saturday night was the best crowd that he has ever seen in the 38 years of the fair.
    According to Falbo, Saturday night set a record crowd with the appearance of Three Dog Night.
    One member of the Heritage Fair committee said that over 10,000 people came out on Saturday, which put a smile on the faces of vendors.
    “I had food vendors tell me that they sold out of food,” Falbo noted.
    The event started Friday afternoon with heavy showers but quickly cleared up in time for the opening ceremonies. There were many distinguished guests on stage, but none of them got a louder cheer than St. Helena resident Dolores Bell.
    She was the person who entered the Heritage Fair into a contest sponsored by sausage producer Johnsonville Foods looking for the nation’s best community event.
    The fair finished second in the contest and received $1,000 from Johnsonville.
    “This lady right here is someone who recognized us and told Johnsonville about us,” Falbo said at the ceremony. “We owe it all to her.”
    Falbo was not the only person on stage to publicly thank Bell, as she received compliments from Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and Del. John Olszewski, Jr.
    “Dolores, as my St. Helena neighbor, you did a great thing by putting Maryland on the map,” Olszewski said.
    “Dolores Bell did a wonderful job making sure the Heritage Fair was recognized nationally,” Kamenetz added. “But I have a problem with Johnsonville not making us number one, The Dundalk Heritage Fair really is number one.”
    Kamenetz then presented Falbo with a T-shirt that stated “The Dundalk Heritage Fair. It’s really  #1.”
    There was concern in the Dundalk community about how Kamenetz would be received at the fair. After Gov. Martin O’Malley was booed at the Independence Day parade in 2011, some were worried about a similar incident at Kamenetz’s appearance, but he received lukewarm cheers with no booing.
    Falbo said after the ceremony, Kamenetz stayed around the fair and interacted with people.
    “He must have stayed in the beer garden for 45 minutes. He was in there talking to people,” Falbo said.
    “There was one woman whose son said something to him about the closing of the Government Center. I did not think that was the time nor the place.”
    After the opening ceremony, the Mahoney Brothers went on stage. They were followed by headliners Three Dog Night on Saturday and Jefferson Starship on Sunday evenings.
    And as usual, the crowd enjoyed plenty of food, carnival rides, pig races, a petting zoo, the offerings of numerous vendors — and pony rides for kids, a new feature at the fair.
    Falbo was impressed that with the record crowds there were few problems and no arrests were made.    
    “All and all, everyone went out happy. The food vendors were happy and the people that came were happy,” Falbo added.
    “I told [parade committee chair] Pat Herman that it is your turn [with the parade on Thursday],” Falbo said with a laugh. 

 

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Three Dog Night entertained crowd with evening of hits

Band packed 18 songs into its performance

by Bill Gates

    When your band has 21 Top 40 hits, it can be tough squeezing them all into a one-hour-and-45-minute concert.
    Three Dog Night came close, performing 14 of those top 40 hits on Saturday night at the Dundalk Heritage Fair.
    Not that there was any pressure.
    After opening with “Family of Man,” “One-Man Band,” “Black and White,” “Never Been to Spain,” “Shambala” “Out in the Country,” “Easy to be Hard” and “Another Old-Fashioned Love Song,” one of Three Dog Night’s founding members, Cory Wells, told the crowd:
    “We have some brand-new songs you’ve probably never heard before.”
    From the 5,000 or so people sitting on the lawn in front of the main stage at the fair practically came a collective “No.”
    “We want the oldies!” a voice from the crowd called.
    So, Wells said the band would perform “an old new song” — a song from the old days, but one that didn’t get much attention at the time.
    It was a song written by Randy Newman (“Short People,” “Baltimore”) which was recorded by Three Dog Night in 1975, but wasn’t a hit.
    It was recorded by Joe Cocker in 1986 and was a minor hit, reaching No. 35  in the hot 100.
    (It reached No. 1 in England after being recorded by a British band, but as Wells said: “I know; who cares?”)
    The song: “You Can Leave Your Hat On.”
alt    After satisfying the crowd with “One,” the band played another “old new song”: “It Ain’t Easy.”
    “This is another song we put a lot of energy into,” Danny Hutton said. “We actually named the album after the song because we thought it would be a hit.
    “But, in 1970, they wouldn’t play songs with these kind of lyrics. Today, they play anything.”
    (Looking up the lyrics, there doesn’t seem to be anything controversial. Times really have changed.)
    The band displayed its range with its next song, another non-hit:  “Heart of Blues.”
    “We’ve been on all sorts of musical charts,” Wells said. “Rock, easy listening, country back when it was called country and western.”
    “We’ve also been on the medical charts recently,” Hutton interjected.
    “Heart of Blues” was released in 2009. In addition to being on the rhythm and blues charts, Hutton said the band once recorded a song with the London Symphony Orchestra that earned them a mention on the classical charts.
    After “The Show Must Go On” and “Liar,” Three Dog Night treated the crowd to the “extended” version of the No. 1 hit “Mama (Told Me Not to Come).”
    After performing the usual version of the song, a story about a man who goes to a party and is aghast of all the illicit substances being consumed, Wells said the band has been told the song is “the great, great, great grand-dad of rap music.
    “So, I’ve often thought of how we would have to do the song today in the 21st century.”
    Hutton said they gathered “the guys” together for ideas on how to perform the song for the 21st Century.”
    Which led to Hutton donning sunglasses, a gold chain around his neck and a sideways baseball cap, then again performing the song while frequently grabbing his crotch.
    This nearly 12-minute version of “Mama” was followed by “Celebrate,” whereupon the band left the stage.
    Briefly, of course. For an encore, the returned and performed “Prayer for the Children.”
    That wasn’t the song the crowd wanted, of course. And Three Dog Night didn’t disappoint them.
    “I think it’s time for that bullfrog song,” Wells said, and the band tore into a rousing closing number “Joy to the World.”
    The final tally for the show: 18 songs, including 14 of the band’s 21 Top 40 hits.
    Yeah, “Eli’s Coming” didn’t make the cut, along with the band’s first hit “Try a Little Tenderness.”
    “Our job is to take you back to the 1970s,” Hutton said at the start of the show.
    In that, Three Dog Night excelled.

 

 

 

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Jefferson Starship brings back the Summer of Love

No “Miracles,” but a great set nonetheless

by Bill Gates

alt    Jefferson Starship apparently doesn’t go in much for bantering with the audience.
    The band played a very efficient set on Sunday night at the Dundalk Heritage Festival, smoothly moving from one song to the next with very little chatter.
    Some may have missed the interaction. On the other hand, during Three Dog Night’s performance the night before, the band members spent so much time talking to the audience that one member of the crowd warned “the natives are getting restless.”
    (i.e.: Start singing.)
    The crowd watching Jefferson Starship’s performance was likely more upset by the band’s failure to play it’s 1975 hit “Miracles” than it was by the absence of banter.
    Seriously: Jefferson Starship didn’t play “Miracles.” It’s only the band’s highest-charting single, reaching number 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.
    The band left the stage after closing with “Somebody to Love” and the lights went down.
    People in the crowd started calling “Play ‘Miracles’!”
    Jefferson Starship returned to the stage for it’s expected encore ... and did a tremendous high-energy performance of “Volunteers.”
alt    (The night before, Three Dog Night had teased the crowd by performing “Prayer for the Children” as their encore, before ending with the desired “Joy to the World.”)
    Jefferson Starship again exited the stage after “Volunteers.” And didn’t return, despite continued calls to “Play ‘Miracles’.”
    Well, it is a seven-minute song with a raunchy line.
    Other than the lack of “Miracles,” the Jefferson Starship set list didn’t disappoint longtime fans of the band that traces its beginnings back to 1965 and excelled during 1967 — “The Summer of Love.”
    “You know what they say about the Summer of Love,” founding member Paul Kantner said at the start of the performance on Sunday. “If you were there, you don’t remember it.”
    (Okay, so there was a little interaction.)
    Jefferson Starship opened with “Have You Seen the Saucers” and “She has Funny Cars.”
    They followed that with a big hit from the 1980s — “Find Your Way Back” — and “Crown of Creation,” a top 10 hit for Jefferson Airplane in the 1960’s.
alt    The band then did a cover of “Get Together” and followed it with a rousing audience participation performance of “Count on Me,” a top 10 hit from 1978.
    After covering “Fresh Air” (originally done by the Quicksilver Messenger Service), the band played “Wooden Ships” (not to be confused with the Crosby, Stills and Nash song) and the classic “White Rabbit.”
    Some of the band then took a break, during which time there was an excellent guitar solo by Jude Gould.
    When the rest of the band returned they broke into “The Other Side of Life,” a B-side from 1969, and “Fast Buck Freddie.”
    (See, there used to be these things called 45s, and they were played on record players, and one side had a hit song and the “B” side had another song off the album. Sometimes, the “B” sides were better.)
    Someone in the crowd then called for “Volunteers.”
    “We’re getting to it,” Kantner replied.
    First, however, they performed “Jane,” a top 20 hit from 1979 and “The Ballad of You and Me and  Pooneil” from 1967.
alt    As that song tailed off, most of the band members again left the stage, this time for a great drum solo from Donny Baldwin.
    “We’re going to leave you with one more song to dance your way home with,” Kantner said. “Maybe two, if we can get an encore.”
    They then broke into “Somebody to Love,” which, “Miracles” or not, made the entire evening worthwhile.

 

 

 

 

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HERITAGE FAIR PICS

Clockwise from top left: Kids enjoyed pony rides at this year’s fair; Uncle Sam towered over fairgoers; Phineus T. Waggs and his monkey pal, Django, delighted onlookers; fairgoers went hog wild over the pig races; hungry and thirsty patrons had their choice with a variety of concession stands; Home Depot employees provided fun activities at their kids workshop booth; Josh & Good Old Stuff entertained fans on the Dunmanway stage on Sunday; The Civil Air Patrol’s Osprey Composite Squadron set a patriotic tone with a presentation on the American flag; llamas were among the attractions at the fair’s petting zoo.   all photos by Dundalk Eagle staff

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From left to right: Top row: Dolores Bell, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and other dignitaries join Heritage Committee leaders to cut the ribbon to begin the 2013 Heritage Fair; excited fairgoers enjoyed the festivities; second row: Tom Toporovich was Master of Ceremonies at the opening of the fair; Rob Baier, lead singer of party rock band Faded Image, entertained the crowd; the classic rock band Rich and the Roadrunners performed Friday on the Dunmanway Stage; third row: two children show how much fun they’re having on the parachute ride during the fair on Saturday; chainsaw sculptor Joe Stebbing turned tree stumps into works of art; one young fairgoer tried his hand at a game of ring toss on the midway; fourth row: as always, the wild rides were a hit at the fair; antique cars were parked on the Dundalk Elementary School lot and Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 451 of Dundalk presented the colors during the opening ceremonies.  all photos by Dundalk Eagle staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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